How to thrive as a Web Tester – My Takeaways

Once we buy the book How to thrive as a Web Tester: Thoughts on how to thrive as a Software Tester and over 30 ideas to guide your web testing by Rom Lambert we not only get a copy but a support website page as well, which is a collection of links to all the useful tools that are mentioned in the book.

The book itself can be divided into two parts – as the subtitle anticipates.

The first half of the book is more about how to thrive as a Software Tester in general.

My favourite quote, the strongest takeaway for me is in here, in this first part:

Continue reading How to thrive as a Web Tester – My Takeaways

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Get yourself beyond your own limitations. Learn from your bug reports!

Every tester is familiar with the characteristics of a good bug report. Tons of blog entries and articles have been published about what makes a bug report good and what is advisable to avoid.

A bug report for me is like a sheet music. When someone reads it can replay its content without any misunderstanding. Musical symbols describe pitch, rhythm, tempo just like the “steps to reproduce” section in the bug report with just enough information.

Continue reading Get yourself beyond your own limitations. Learn from your bug reports!

Quarantining failing tests is similar to death sentence

There may be times when you want to prevent a failing test from causing the whole build to fail so you put failing tests into quarantine.
You have the assumption that when you have time, you’ll fix up those failing tests. Or someone else will do it.

The reality shows a different picture.

Why are tests quarantined?
Tests can end up in quarantine when it is thought to be flaky for example, or a part of the component is being rewritten which is still in progress so that tests would fail, yet the code has to be merged in, etc.

Continue reading Quarantining failing tests is similar to death sentence